Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (2022)

Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (1) Example of an acetate label[/caption]

Most record collectors, like any other buyers of phonograph records, are primarily interested in commercial releases; that is, copies of records that were manufactured with the intention that they be sold at retail to the public. These are the kinds of records that are likely to comprise the bulk of anyone’s record collections

Serious collectors are usually interested in owning just about anything and everything produced by artists that they admire, and unusual items such as acetate pressings (also known as “acetates” or “lacquers”) or test pressings. These are records or components of record production that were manufactured not for sale, but to evaluate the process of making the commercial record itself.

As both acetates and test pressings are fairly rare, they tend to command a lot of interest in the collector market. While such pressings by any artist are rare, there is generally a lot of interest in acetates and test pressings by artists who are themselves popular with collectors, such as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and so on.

In this article, we’ll discuss the nature of acetates and test pressings, how they are made, why they are made, and what makes them of interest to collectors.

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Acetates and Lacquers
Uses for Acetates
Collector Interest in Acetates
Counterfeit Acetates
Test Pressings
Collector Interest in Test Pressings
Counterfeit Test Pressings
Conclusion

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    An original 1961 stereo acetate for Great Instrumental Hits Styled By Jonah Jones by the Jonah Jones Quartet.

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Acetates and Lacquers

While acetate pressings are usually referred to by record sellers and collectors as “acetates,” the term used to describe them within the industry is “lacquers.” That term makes more sense, as there isn’t any acetate used in the production of these records. For purposes of this article, however, we’ll call them “acetates,” as that’s the popular term used in the record collecting world.

Acetates represent the first step in the physical manufacture of a record, be it a single or an album. While acetates are technically “records” in the sense that they can be played on a turntable or phonograph, they are not pressed out of plastic using mechanical stampers, as are commercial records.

Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (5)

Instead, acetates are individually created using a cutting lathe, which is a device that loosely resembles a turntable. Acetates are lacquer-coated aluminum discs that are entirely smooth when first manufactured. They are “cut” by placing them on a cutting lathe that has a signal fed to the cutting head from either a live audio source or a performance recorded on magnetic tape. As the music plays, the cutting head cuts a groove in the soft lacquer surface.

The lacquer-coated disc rotates while the music plays, and the recording engineer controls the lathe, which must be periodically adjusted to compensate for changes in volume during the performance and to allow for gaps in between tracks.

In the early days of recording, music was played live in the studio and recorded directly to acetate discs. Since the 1940s, most performances are recorded first to magnetic tape and then transferred to acetates at the convenience of the record company.

Once the cutting process is complete, the disc is playable on any turntable to evaluate the performance, if necessary. Due to the softness of the lacquer coating, acetates are not particularly durable and will wear out and become noisy with repeated play. Acetates that are used for evaluation purposes are not generally used for production. Other discs will be cut for that purpose and then will be nickel-plated as part of the process to produce the stampers that will be used to make test pressings and later, records for sale to the public.

Uses for Acetates

Acetates are made for two purposes – to evaluate a recording and its suitability for pressing records and to use in the production of the finished product itself. For production, an acetate is first nickel plated and the plating is removed to create a negative image known as a father.

Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (6)

This process can be repeated by plating the father to produce a positive image known as a mother. The mother can be duplicated to create stampers. Typically, a father can be used to create about ten mothers and each mother can create ten stampers. A stamper can be used to press anywhere from 300-1000 finished records.

If all of the mothers and stampers are exhausted due to high production, another acetate must be cut and the process repeated.

Acetates are considerably heavier than records of a comparable size and usually weigh two to three times as much. While most acetates do have a label, these are generally generic labels with blank lines intended to be filled in by hand. Information found on the labels of acetate pressings usually consist of the name of the artist, the title(s) of the song(s) and perhaps the date the disc was cut and the timing of the song(s) on the disc.

Lacquer-coated blanks used to cut acetates used to have more than one hole near the center. One was the usual centering hole for the cutting lathe and/or turntable spindle; the other was a drive hole that fit a pin on the lathe to ensure that the disc wouldn’t slip on the lathe. More modern cutting lathes use a vacuum pump to hold the disc in place, making the drive hole unnecessary.

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On rare occasions, there is a third purpose for acetates – sometimes, when a record company is in a hurry to get their album or single to radio stations, they will send acetates directly to radio. These are usually supplemented with regular vinyl pressings as soon as it can be arranged, as acetates are entirely unsuited to repeated play, as might be warranted by having them played on the radio.

Collector Interest in Acetates

What is the appeal of lacquers and acetates to collectors? There are a few reasons that collectors might be interested in owning acetates by the artists whom they collect:

Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (7)

They’re rare. Obviously, as acetates must be cut on a lathe, one at a time, they are going to be extremely limited in production. In general, there are probably fewer than a half dozen acetates cut of any single or album title. Most will be used for record production, and the process of plating them to produce a father destroys them.

A few others will be used for evaluation or promotional purposes, though it’s relatively rare for acetates to find their way out of the hands of record company personnel and into the public market. Their rarity alone makes them desirable. A popular album may sell in the millions, but only a couple of people are likely to ever have the opportunity to own an acetate copy of that album.

Good sound – Acetates sound terrific. While acetates are not suitable for repeated play on a turntable, they are playable and they usually sound better than the finished records sold at retail. Acetates are cut directly from the tape, where records are made from stampers that are made using multiple plating processes. Each step on the process to create a stamper creates a slight loss in quality, so acetates that haven’t been worn out from too much play will almost always sound better than finished records.

Unique content – Sometimes, artists have acetates prepared of songs just to hear how they sound as a record, though they may not have any intention of releasing them commercially. These may be working versions of songs that are later changed before release or songs that aren’t intended to be released at all.

On other occasions, acetates may be cut of “working” versions of albums, where the order of the songs may not be final. In other cases, one or more songs may appear on an acetate made early in the production process of an album but the final version of that album may not include them, making the acetate a rare collectible. We recently saw an acetate of the 1977 album The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl that was a working version of the album that contained two songs that were not on the finished LP. Those two songs have never been commercially released, making that particular acetate a desirable Beatles rarity.

About two years ago, someone found a box containing nearly 150 Bob Dylan acetates in a building in New York. Many of these acetates contained unreleased songs and/or different versions of songs from the versions that have been commercially released. Several of these discs have been sold publicly at prices in the several-thousand-dollar range.

Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (8)

A few bootleg albums have been released in acetate form over the years, simply as a gimmick. The only titles we have seen like this originated in Japan, usually in limited editions of no more than twenty five copies. As producing discs one at at time is both expensive and labor intensive, product of bootleg acetates as a commercial product is not a very common practice.

Prices for acetates can vary widely, depending on the artist and the content. Obviously, the more collectible the artist, the greater the interest from the collecting community. While all acetates are rare, collectors will be more interested in (and pay higher prices for) examples that feature unreleased material or versions of songs that are not otherwise available.

An acetate of an album by an artist that isn’t particularly collectible might sell for $10 or even less. On the other hand, an acetate containing unreleased material by a well-known artist might sell for thousands of dollars. About ten years ago, an acetate containing rough versions of the material that became the first album by the Velvet Underground sold for more than $25,000. That material has since been released commercially.

An acetate of Elvis Presley’s first recording sold for $300,000 in 2015 to musician Jack White of White Stripes fame.

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Counterfeit Acetates

Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (9)

Unfortunately, in the collecting world, nearly anything of value has been counterfeited, and that includes test pressings and acetates. They’re rare, they’re in demand, and they can sell for a lot of money, and that has led unscrupulous individuals to create acetates that appear to be original, record company-produced products but are actually homemade items that have no inherent value.

While counterfeit acetates exist for a number of artists, the most common artist represented by these discs is the Beatles. Many of these fake discs have labels that say either “EMIDISC” or have a representation of the Beatles’ own Apple label.

Since legitimate Beatles acetates turn up infrequently, few potential buyers have enough experience to be able to determine if an item offered for sale is a legitimate item or a counterfeit.

Many of these counterfeits have been artificially aged to give them a look of authenticity, and a number of them have sold for three and four figure prices at auction. The best advice we can offer to potential buyer is to know your seller and to get a guarantee when you make your purchase.

Test Pressings

Along with acetates, collector also have a lot of interest in records known as test pressings. It’s not a clever name; a test pressing is exactly what the name suggests – a record manufactured for the express purpose of evaluating the finished product.

Test pressings might be manufactured for the purpose of listening to material that is being considered for commercial release or they might be made as a test of production stampers for a finished commercial record.

Unlike acetates, test pressings are vinyl records pressed from stampers and are physically virtually identical to commercially available records. The only difference is that test pressings usually have custom labels similar to those found on acetates. These labels might have the words “test pressing” pre-printed on them and may include blank lines that can be filled in by hand to indicate the name of the artist, the title of the album, the catalog number and perhaps the date of manufacture.

Like acetates, test pressings are occasionally sent out to radio stations for promotional use if the production discs aren’t yet ready, but most of the time, they’re simply used to evaluate the finished product. This would include making sure that the record contains the correct and intended versions of the songs on it, that the sound quality is acceptable and that the playing order is correct.

Test pressings are usually found without printed covers. They are usually packaged in plain white covers. Often they will be accompanied by a “label copy sheet,” which is a sheet of paper that contains the information that would ordinarily be printed on the label of a finished album – the album title and catalog number, the name of the artist, song titles and running times, the name of the record company and publishing information for the songs themselves.

Collector Interest in Test Pressings

Collectors like test pressings for many of the same reasons that they like acetates. While they are made further along in the manufacturing process than acetates, test pressings are usually the first discs made from production stampers, so they will likely sound better than commercially available, or “stock” copies of the records sold in stores.

Scarcity – Test pressings, like acetates, are also relatively rare. While acetates may be unique or limited to just a couple of discs, test pressings are usually manufactured in larger, though still limited, quantities. Unless test pressings are made to be issued as promotional copies, they are generally limited to no more than twenty copies, though the number of discs manufactured can vary widely.

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Acetates and Test Pressings – Souvenirs of Record Production (12)

Alternate or unreleased material – Like acetates, test pressings sometimes contain either unreleased material or songs that are different in some way from the commercially available versions of that particular album. The 1972 Beach Boys album Holland was originally intended to include a song called “We Got Love,” but the record company was unhappy with the song selection. The group recorded a song called “Sail On, Sailor” that was used in the place of “We Got Love” on the commercial release. A few test pressings of the earlier version exist and are of great interest to Beach Boys collectors.

A few test pressings of Bob Dylan’s 1975 LP Blood on the Tracks exist with different songs from the released version. The album was close to its release date when Dylan decided to rerecord a large portion of the album. Reportedly, only five copies of the test pressing of the original recording are known to exist. One of them recently sold for $12,000.

Test pressings of Bruce Springsteen’s 1975 album Born to Run were sent to radio stations in a printed gatefold cover that was blank on the inside and which featured the name of the artist and the title of the album in a font that looked like handwriting, rather than the block print used on the final version. Several hundred of these “script cover” test pressings were sent out to radio stations and are quite sought after today, usually selling for upwards of $1500 when they’re offered for sale.

The first live album by Genesis, 1974’s Genesis Live, was briefly intended to be a two record set but was ultimately released as a single album. A few test pressings of the two record set were made in the Netherlands. This set includes material that has otherwise never been released, and the few copies that have turned up over the years have sold for as much as $4000 at auction.

The audiophile label Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs released eight titles in the early 1980s as Ultra High Quality Recordings, or UHQR, as they are known. These titles were made using a then-uncommon heavy-weight 200 gram vinyl pressed with a special “flat” profile that the company did not use for their regular pressings. All eight titles were limited to 5000 copies for commercial sale. The company also made test pressings of a handful of titles that they were considering releasing in the UHQR format, but which they ultimately decided not to release.

These titles included all thirteen of the UK Beatles albums, along with A Trick of the Tail by Genesis, Rickie Lee Jones’s first album, and The Grand Illusion by Styx, among others. These rarely-seen test pressings usually sell for upwards of $1000 each on the rare occasions when they are offered for sale.

Unreleased albums – Occasionally, artists will complete an album with the intention of commercial release, only to have the release canceled for any one of a number of reasons. These unreleased albums usually exist in the form of test pressings, and sometimes they turn up for sale.

One good example would be Läther, by Frank Zappa. The album, intended as a four-record set, was recorded in 1977. Zappa’s record company rejected the finished album, though test pressings exist. The album was finally released officially in 1996.

Another unreleased Zappa album, Crush All Boxes, was intended for release in 1980, but was scrapped in favor of releasing You Are What You Is instead. At least one test pressing is known to exist of that title.

Counterfeit Test Pressings

While counterfeit acetates are fairly common, counterfeit test pressings are not. We have seen a few examples over the years, including the original version of Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks. The most common counterfeit test pressings would be for titles that were otherwise unreleased. Buyers should exercise due diligence when considering a purchase, but as a rule, counterfeit test pressings are relatively uncommon.

The nice thing about test pressings is that they are physically no different from a commercially available album, which means that they can be played as often as any other record. Most collectors don’t buy them to play them, however; instead they tend to buy them as a collectible item in addition to the regular version of the album.

Acetates and Test Pressings Conclusion

While acetates and test pressings could hardly be regarded as something that every collector might find essential, they are unusual and interesting items to add to one’s collection. They’re relatively rare, they usually offer superior sound, and they occasionally offer access to material that otherwise might not be commercially available.

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Click here to see our selection of acetates
Click here to see our selection of test pressings

FAQs

Are test pressings valuable? ›

Test pressings are extremely important for a pressing plant, because this is the first time audio material gets transferred to a vinyl format.

What are test pressings for? ›

In most cases, a test pressing is the first opportunity to hear your digitally recorded project in an analog format. It's also a safety net to ensure that there's been no human error during the mastering stage (and by mastering in this example we're talking about DMM or lacquer cutting).

What are record pressings? ›

A record press is a machine for manufacturing vinyl records. It is essentially a hydraulic press fitted with thin nickel stampers which are negative impressions of a master disc. Labels and a pre-heated vinyl patty (or "biscuit") are placed in a heated mold cavity.

What is the difference between an acetate and a test pressing? ›

Unlike acetates, test pressings are vinyl records pressed from stampers and are physically virtually identical to commercially available records. The only difference is that test pressings usually have custom labels similar to those found on acetates.

Can you play test pressings? ›

What Is A Vinyl Record Test Pressing?? - YouTube

Can you play Test press vinyl? ›

Test pressings are supposed to be destroyed, and most of them are. A few that have cosmetic flaws (like an off-center label) but are playable may be sent to reviewers, program directors, and industry influencers to promote the record.

How long do test pressings take? ›

Once your order form, music, and deposit have been received it can take roughly 3-4 weeks for your test pressings to be shipped. Once you approve your tests and all of the components (jackets, inserts, stickers, etc.) have been received it typically takes 3-4 weeks for your order to be completed.

What is a test pressing CD? ›

Test pressings, usually with test pressing written on the label, with catalogue number, artist and recording time or date, are the first vinyl discs made at the factory.

How are acetate records made? ›

Unlike ordinary vinyl records, which are quickly formed from lumps of plastic by a mass-production molding process, an acetate disc is created by using a recording lathe to cut an audio-signal-modulated groove into the surface of a lacquer-coated blank disc, a sequential operation requiring expensive, delicate ...

Why are first pressings better? ›

First pressings of a vinyl record are generally more desirable. They're seen as more “authentic,” and so vinyl lovers will generally pay more for that first edition. If there's anything unique about that album — a special cover, a sticker, a band poster or an insert — it's going to be in that first pressing.

How are records recorded? ›

When a vinyl record is made, a needle is used to create grooves in the vinyl that is basically recorded information of the desired sound or music. A needle (or stylus) is also used to read the information contained in the grooves, playing it back so that we can hear the recorded information.

How do you know if a record is an original pressing? ›

A closer look at the spine of the record sleeve will also help determine whether you have an original pressing. Original pressings usually have a four-letter and number combination like WXYZ-1234. Other records after the second or third pressing have two letters and five number combinations, such as XY-12345.

What is an acetate pressing? ›

A recording industry term for a test pressing of a phonograph record. The acetate disc is created in the mastering stage of record production and is used to determine how the recorded material will transfer to disc.

Can you make a record out of glass? ›

Glass records are still used today but serve as a reminder of a time before the concept of what constituted a record was set in stone.

What is a shellac record? ›

Shellacs or 78s, also called coarse groove gramophone discs, were the main mass produced audio format of the first half of the 20th century. The shellac discs were pressed from a wax matrix that was made during a professional recording.

What is a metal acetate? ›

An acetate /ˈæsɪteɪt/ is a salt formed by the combination of acetic acid with a base (e.g. alkaline, earthy, metallic, nonmetallic or radical base). "

How much does it cost to get a record pressed? ›

How Much Does the Record Pressing Process Cost?
Cost elementAverage costExample cost for a pressing of 100 records
Pressing set-up fee$190$190
Test pressing (5)$65$65
140g black vinyl record (per unit)$1.55$155
Total demonstrative cost for pressing run of 100 records:$1225
5 more rows

How much does it cost to press 500 vinyl? ›

Vinyl Pricing
Standard Black Vinyl Pressing Pricing
500$1090$1830
1000$1360$2465
Colored Vinyl (per 100)add $65 per 100add$85 per 100
Extra Tests (each)$2.00$2.50
6 more rows
1 Dec 2021

How much is it to get a vinyl pressed? ›

Pressing vinyl isn't cheap, but fans are willing to pay more for real records that they can hold in their hands. Expect to pay anywhere between $1000-$3000 for a pressing of 100-300 copies, depending on if you include artwork (jackets) or spring for colored vinyl!

What is a white label test pressing? ›

A by-product of vinyl are 'white-label' test pressings – so called because there is no sleeve/label artwork at this stage – which record labels produce ahead of the full release of a new album.

What does white label LP mean? ›

White label records

These records, which, you guessed it, have a plain white label in the centre of the record, are typically sent out as promotional copies to radio stations and distributors. Others are simply pressed to test the quality of the recording on vinyl before they are mass produced for commercial sale.

Can you play an acetate record? ›

playing an acetate disk with no writing for the first time + channel update

What is the difference between plastic and acetate? ›

Acetate is a plant-based, non-petroleum product derived from wood pulp and cotton, allowing it to be stronger, more durable and more flexible than regular plastic. Consequently frames made with acetate are more resistant to pressure placed upon frames, which means it can be bent further before breaking.

What were original records made of? ›

At first, the discs were commonly made from shellac, with earlier records having a fine abrasive filler mixed in. Starting in the 1940s polyvinyl chloride became common, hence the name "vinyl".

Are original pressings always better? ›

Original pressings may not always be the best quality if taken from a certain decade; vinyl quality and consistency of recordings can vary wildly between decades. Here's a bit of background and the reasons why. Pre-1970s vinyl is generally considered as some of the best original pressings you can get.

How do you find the value of records? ›

Here are four ways to determine the value of a vinyl record or record collection:
  1. Check record prices online. Use these online resources to check vinyl records values: ...
  2. Get a record price guide. You can purchase vinyl record price guides such as the following: ...
  3. Get your records appraised. ...
  4. Ask record stores, online and off.

What does first press mean? ›

Definition. The Definition of a first pressing or pressed vinyl record, is a record that was pressed from the 1st original masters. There seems to be some controversy between record collectors of what is a first pressing as opposed to first issues.

How do you make a record? ›

How Do You Make a Vinyl Record? | Music Life - YouTube

How do records work? ›

Simply put, a vinyl record works by spinning on the record player, commonly known as a turntable. A stylus on the record player moves through the grooves imprinted on the disc and “reads” them. This reading generates an electric signal which is transferred to an amplifier.

How do records store sound? ›

The sound isn't amplified mechanically: it's carried through the tone arm to a cartridge containing coils in a magnetic field. These coils take the vibrations and amplify them electronically through speakers. Many record collectors say the sound is "warmer" than digital music.

How do you clean LP records? ›

To clean your vinyl records, grab a microfiber cleaning cloth to remove the dust and static from the record. Next, dampen a clean microfiber cloth (preferably with distilled water) and lightly wipe the record surface in a circular motion — but steer clear of the middle of the record.

What is the rarest vinyl record? ›

What is this? In 2015, White Album No. 000001, which had been kept in good condition by Ringo Starr for nearly 50 years, was sold at auction for $790,000. This first copy of the White Album is the most valuable and rarest vinyl record ever in the world.

What does masterdisk mean on vinyl? ›

Masterdisk is an audio mastering company based out of NY. The number is used to denote what batch the record has been pressed in. 3.

What is a record lacquer? ›

Lacquers are the physical bridge between recorded sound and the finished record. As the medium onto which music is transferred, and from which stampers are created, master discs or lacquers represent a crucial part of the vinyl manufacturing process.

What are vinyl records made of? ›

PVC (polyvinyl chloride), the material that vinyl records are made of, is clear in its natural form, allowing records to be manufactured in just about any color imaginable. Despite this endless array of choices, black is still overwhelmingly the most common option, leaving the burning question: why?

What is a record Stamper? ›

After the master record is cut, two stampers are created (each one representing one side of the record) so that they can be used in the record pressing process. The stampers are essentially a reverse image of the master's record grooves and are used to press the actual records.

What is the proper way to store records? ›

You want to store vinyl records in a cool place—not too cold, but not too hot. If the vinyl is exposed to high heat for extended periods of time, it can lead to warping and other damaging effects. If you have a temperature-controlled attic or storage unit, that can be a great choice.

How do you melt records into shelves? ›

How to Make a Recycled Vinyl Record Organizer - YouTube

How can I make my own home records? ›

You put a blank record on the turntable, plug the machine into any audio source you have using a minijack, press the start button and record your music straight to the blank, turning it into a brand new LP.

How do you clean shellac records? ›

Shellac Stacks: How to Clean 78s - YouTube

How do I know if my record is shellac? ›

Spotting the Differences: Shellac vs Vinyl

Shellac is know to be heavier, harder, colder and more rigid. Hold it up by an edge and knock on it. It should almost resonate in a kind of a way. Generally a lot thicker than regular vinyl, but sometimes it's hard to tell.

How do I know if my record is 33 45 or 78? ›

78s hold about five minutes of music, while 33s hold up to approximately 20 minutes. 78 RPM records have a faster RPM speed than both 33 and 45 RPM records. 78s have wider grooves than vinyl records, which means that the stylus also needs to be wider. 78 RPM records are mono and are only heard through one channel.

How long do test pressings take? ›

Once your order form, music, and deposit have been received it can take roughly 3-4 weeks for your test pressings to be shipped. Once you approve your tests and all of the components (jackets, inserts, stickers, etc.) have been received it typically takes 3-4 weeks for your order to be completed.

What is a test pressing CD? ›

Test pressings, usually with test pressing written on the label, with catalogue number, artist and recording time or date, are the first vinyl discs made at the factory.

What is a promotional copy record? ›

A promotional recording, or promo, or plug copy, is an audio or video recording distributed free, usually in order to promote a recording that is or soon will be commercially available.

What is a white label record? ›

White label records are vinyl records with adhesive plain white labels affixed. Test pressings, usually with Test Pressing written on the label, with catalogue number, artist and recording time or date, are produced in small quantities to evaluate the quality of the disc production.

How much does it cost to get a record pressed? ›

How Much Does the Record Pressing Process Cost?
Cost elementAverage costExample cost for a pressing of 100 records
Pressing set-up fee$190$190
Test pressing (5)$65$65
140g black vinyl record (per unit)$1.55$155
Total demonstrative cost for pressing run of 100 records:$1225
5 more rows

How much does it cost to press 500 vinyl? ›

Vinyl Pricing
Standard Black Vinyl Pressing Pricing
500$1090$1830
1000$1360$2465
Colored Vinyl (per 100)add $65 per 100add$85 per 100
Extra Tests (each)$2.00$2.50
6 more rows
1 Dec 2021

How much is it to get a vinyl pressed? ›

Pressing vinyl isn't cheap, but fans are willing to pay more for real records that they can hold in their hands. Expect to pay anywhere between $1000-$3000 for a pressing of 100-300 copies, depending on if you include artwork (jackets) or spring for colored vinyl!

What is a white label test pressing? ›

A by-product of vinyl are 'white-label' test pressings – so called because there is no sleeve/label artwork at this stage – which record labels produce ahead of the full release of a new album.

What is a shellac record? ›

Shellacs or 78s, also called coarse groove gramophone discs, were the main mass produced audio format of the first half of the 20th century. The shellac discs were pressed from a wax matrix that was made during a professional recording.

How are acetate records made? ›

Unlike ordinary vinyl records, which are quickly formed from lumps of plastic by a mass-production molding process, an acetate disc is created by using a recording lathe to cut an audio-signal-modulated groove into the surface of a lacquer-coated blank disc, a sequential operation requiring expensive, delicate ...

Can you sell promotional records? ›

In the US to sell promos is illegal. The record stores were selling them and got fined for selling them.

What were promo records used for? ›

Promo records are those mostly sent to radio stations, usually with the words “Not For Sale” or “Promotional Copy” printed on the label. In most cases the record label on a promo copy will have a different color than the copy sold in stores. Promos can often be worth a lot more than those sold in stores.

Are promo records better? ›

That means that the white label promo pressings are among the first records pressed from the stampers for a particular release, which generally means they may sound better than their stock counterparts.

What is another name for white label? ›

What is White Label and/or Private Label? The terms white label and private label are often used interchangeably (however there are subtle nuances). White labeling is when a product or service removes their brand and logo from the end product and instead uses the branding requested by the purchaser.

What is an example of a white label product? ›

The end product appears as though it has been produced by the purchaser. White label products are easily spotted on store shelves, as they have the retailer's own name (commonly known as the "store brand") on the label. For example, Whole Foods Market's "365 Everyday Value" line of products.

What is private label brands? ›

A private label product is manufactured by a contract or third-party manufacturer and sold under a retailer's brand name. As the retailer, you specify everything about the product – what goes in it, how it's packaged, what the label looks like – and pay to have it produced and delivered to your store.

Videos

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(Insider)
2. Acetate Records band :- Telepathy
(Shade x-ray)
3. FDA Center for Tobacco Products Listening Session – June 15, 2022
(U.S. Food and Drug Administration)
4. Live from The 'In' Groove 8/1/21 Q & A With Mike and Angel
(The 'In' Groove)
5. South African Acetate Discs by Craig Piper (1980)
(Collecting Queen)
6. The Stranglers - ‘No More Heroes’ - Brazilian Pressing
(Ken’s Music & Hi-Fi Channel)

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